Mrs. Holmes

Phone: (919) 464-2314

Email:

Degrees and Certifications:

B.S. Mathematics B.S. Secondary Mathematics Education

Mrs. Holmes

Welcome!

Mathematics is truly a beautiful and interesting field of study that helps you understand the world around you. Skills you will improve by actively participating in your mathematics courses include the following: problem-solving, communication, critical thinking, reasoning, leadership, collaboration, and more! Several keys to success include keeping a positive attitude, never giving up, asking questions when needed, and doing your work to the best of your ability (which includes showing your work).

If you need to contact me, please feel free to email me.

  • Fall  2018 Schedule

    Pride Time 2nd block in Smith 138

    Honors NC Math 2 3rd block in Smith 133

    NC Math 1B 4th block in Smith 133

     

    "For the things of this world  cannot be made known without a knowledge of mathematics." 
    - Roger Bacon

JCPS Announcements

  • Math Myths

    Posted by Sarah Holmes on 7/20/2017 11:00:00 AM

    When people find out that I’m a math teacher, they usually say one of two things: “Oh, I’m so sorry!” or “I was never any good at math; I’m just not a math person.”

    Why are these the most common responses, and why do people have such a negative view about mathematics?  I think a lot of math’s “bad reputation” stems from several mathematical myths.

     

    Here are some of the main mathematical myths:

    • All of us our born with a certain amount of math intelligence, and there's not much we can do to change that.
    • Some people are math people; others are not.
    • Mistakes are embarrassing, and you're obviously not good at math if you make mistakes.
    • People who do math quickly are good at math, and people who can't do math quickly are not good at math.

    The statements above are not true at all, and yet it seems like most people believe at least one of these myths!  There's a lot of research out there that actually shows some exciting evidence about math and our brains, which includes the following:

    • Brains grow and change.
    • There is no such thing as a math person or a math brain.
    • Mistakes are powerful.  They make our brains grow!
    • It is very important to believe in yourself.
    • Speed is not important.
    • Our brains think about math visually.

    I like to start every course I teach with a Week of Inspirational Math (from Jo Boaler’s site YouCubed), where we spend time playing with math as well as confronting these serious myths about math.  

    It’s important to confront these myths and reshape our thinking.  My goal is to help students develop more of a growth mindset and learn to love math just a little bit more each day.  Afterall, math is so much more than rules and procedures!

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